The Jamie Drake Equation – Christopher Edge

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I am delighted to welcome Christopher Edge to the blog today with a special guest post to celebrate the publication of the amazing ‘The Jamie Drake Equation.’ Ever since the cover reveal back in November this book has been one of my most anticipated reads of 2017 and it doesn’t disappoint. Once again Christopher has managed to expand my mind with this fantastic adventure delivering an emotional story which packs a punch in terms of tension and drama. Wonderfully compelling and brilliantly told this story will take your breath away. Let’s find out more…..

The Jamie Drake Equation

How amazing would it be to have a dad who’s an astronaut? Rocket launches, zero gravity, and flying through space like a superhero! Jamie Drake’s dad is orbiting the Earth in the International Space Station and Jamie ought to think it’s cool but he just really misses him… Hanging out at his local observatory Jamie picks up a strange signal on his phone. It looks like alien life is getting closer to home. But space is a dangerous place and when his dad’s mission goes wrong can Jamie prove that he’s a hero too? A cosmic adventure for anyone who’s ever looked at the stars.

Without further ado let me pass you over to Christopher who is sharing his favourite science adventures.

Top 5 Science Adventures

Science is a gift for storytellers. Here are five of my favourite books that use the wonders of the universe to create wondrous stories.

Phoenix by S. F. Said

This remarkable book brings together huge ideas about alien life, dark matter, black holes and other cosmic concepts to create an epic future-flung adventure that holds up a mirror to today. Telling the story of Lucky, a boy on a quest to find his father against the backdrop of interplanetary war, Said weaves astronomy with mythology to create a stunning story about what it means to be human and how we can all change the universe. With artwork by the amazing Dave McKean, this is a future classic that deserves to be read across the galaxy.

Cosmic by Frank Cottrell Boyce

The only book I’ve ever read which has caused me to laugh myself out of bed, Frank Cottrell Boyce uses the science of space exploration to launch a hilarious story about family, friendship and responsibility. From weightless rides onboard the vomit comet to an unscheduled trip to the dark side of the moon, every single scene is precision-tooled to create a rocket-fuelled tale of adventure that will warm your heart.

Railhead by Philip Reeve

Set in a future where intelligent trains travel between the stars, Railhead thrills the reader from its very first pages as Zen, a young petty thief, races through Ambersai station to escape the drone that is chasing him and catches a train that takes him halfway across the galaxy in an instant. Reeve is a master world-builder, using the scientific concepts of wormholes, artificial intelligence, androids and alien life to construct a dazzlingly imagined universe. This is cinematic storytelling at its very best.

No True Echo by Gareth P. Jones

The mind-bending implications of time travel are explored in this quirky and clever adventure from the eclectic mind of Gareth P. Jones. When a mysterious girl called Scarlett turns up at his school, twelve-year-old Eddie Dane finds himself jumping back in time under the influence of the mysterious ‘echo technology’. Gleefully mixing genres to create a page-turning story, this is a novel that will stretch and enthral the minds of adventurous readers.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

Bristling with more scientific ideas than Professor Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time and more great lines than the collected works of William Shakespeare, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is simply one of the greatest books of all time. Starting with the demolition of the planet Earth to make way for an intergalactic bypass, Douglas Adams takes the reader on a rollercoaster ride across the universe in this gloriously funny book. As the brilliant Russell T. Davies says in his introduction to the latest edition of the novel that I’ve bought (probably the tenth copy that I’ve ever owned) ‘I don’t think Douglas Adams is ever included in the lists of great children’s writers’, but I agree wholeheartedly that he should be.

Christopher Edge

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Christopher grew up in Manchester where he spent most of his childhood in the local library dreaming up stories, but now lives in Gloucestershire where he spends most of his time in the local library dreaming up stories. Before becoming a writer, he worked as an English teacher, editor and publisher – any job that let him keep a book close to hand. He also works as a freelance publisher and education consultant and has written several publications about encouraging children to read.

To find out more about Christopher you can visit his website or follow him on Twitter.

Thank you to Christopher for his special guest post and to Clare at Nosy Crow for inviting me to host this post.

 

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